Oldstyle figures for better statute number legibility

I've been re-evaluating fonts for WebLaws.org, and one issue that caught my eye is the style of the numerals. In running text, these proportional oldstyle numbers (font: Buenard) are perfect: they visually flow with the text. The wide variations in figure height and positioning help the reader unambiguously read the number. But in a vertical navigation bar, … Continue reading Oldstyle figures for better statute number legibility

Reference text web fonts: ITC vs. URW Baskerville vs. Buenard vs. Caslon

I spent a couple of hours today looking at web fonts for legible reference text. After reading the New York Times experiment finding that Baskerville is "the king of fonts", I thought I'd give it a try, comparing it with a couple of others for legibility. I first researched web fonts that I could test … Continue reading Reference text web fonts: ITC vs. URW Baskerville vs. Buenard vs. Caslon

Making the California Laws Easy to Read

I've been doing a lot of work to get the California Codes online, and I now have something to show for it. This is a screenshot of Business & Professions Code Section 22947.4, an anti-spyware statute. (Which is pretty cool; I wonder if Oregon has something similar. Anyone know?) For comparison, here's the original code … Continue reading Making the California Laws Easy to Read

New human-friendly “research trail”

A trail of links for re-tracing your steps which shows up in two places.  There's an intuitive always-present sidebar view: for example, today's research steps are simply marked "Today" --- instead of cluttering the display with today's date.The second, more detailed view of the trail (see screenshot below), is under the "My Laws" tab.  The … Continue reading New human-friendly “research trail”

It’s the little things that count: new spell-corrections in the search results

A lot of small subtle pieces go into making a search experience that's smooth and keeps the visitor in control at all times: breadcrumbs ("Home > Search results"), a new search "form" pre-populated with the previous query, a prompt clearly explaining the results of the last action ("Your search..."), an offer to continue on from … Continue reading It’s the little things that count: new spell-corrections in the search results